HTP poster_final

 

 

The 2013 World Disasters Report uses the term “humanitarian technology” to refer to the empowering nature of technologies for disaster recovery, enabling people to become digital volunteers through a click of the mouse and at the same time helping affected communities to organize and respond to their own problems. The Humanitarian Technologies Project Stakeholder Workshop critically engages this optimistic account of technologies by presenting evidence from our ongoing 18-month research with affected communities in Tacloban and Bantayan. Some of the questions we address are: What are the different ICT-related aid projects undertaken by NGOs, government and tech companies? How are radio and SMS used by affected communities to give feedback and demand aid from NGOs and barangay officials? How is Facebook used for digital storytelling, protest, entertainment and romance in the wake of Typhoon Yolanda?

 

Our workshop invites humanitarian and government workers, local NGOs, academics, media and tech companies, and affected populations from Yolanda to discuss the opportunities as well as risks that media and ICTs pose in disaster recovery. The project team (Dr. Mirca Madianou, Dr Jonathan Ong, Dr Liezel Longboan, Dr Jayeel Cornelio and Dr Nicole Curato) will be presenting preliminary findings from the project, and representatives from UNOCHA and World Vision are expected to give their expert feedback. We are likewise keen to hear your insights and feedback during our event. The workshop will be held at the SDC Conference Hall, Social Development Complex in the Ateneo de Manila University Campus.

 

Because of limited space in our venue, we strongly advise that you reserve your seat by sending an RSVP to project secretary Trina Aligada (trina.aligada@gmail.com / 0917-3055064) by October 31, 2014.

 

For more information and other inquiries, please contact Jonathan Ong (jco10@le.ac.uk).

 

The Humanitarian Technologies Project is funded by the United Kingdom’s Economic and Social Research Council, supported by the Konrad Adenauer Asian Center for Journalism, and investigates the uses of communication technologies in disaster recovery. We are also supported by Ateneo de Manila’s Department of Communication and Development Studies Program, University of the Philippines, Goldsmiths University of London and University of Leicester.